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Intergenerational Justice in Post-colonial Settings: Can Procedures Tame Memories Related to Mass Atrocities?

Intergenerational Justice in Post-colonial Settings: Can Procedures Tame Memories Related to Mass Atrocities?

Online, 6 October 2022

Do parties handle conflicting justice notions when they negotiate about colonial past legacy? This question is at the core of an increasing number of judiciary and non-judiciary processes around the world. From Paris to Canberra, London, Ottawa, Berlin, Washington or Wellington, official representatives face divergent, if not incompatible, expectations regarding the most appropriate way to cope with historical grievances. The presentation will focus on one in-depth empirical case study, namely the Belgian case.

Please register below by 30 September 2022.

Suggested Readings

Valerie Rosoux, ‘Negotiating on Behalf of Previous Generations: Justice in Post-Conflict Contexts’ (2020)  25 (1) International Negotiation 93–108. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1163/15718069-25131238

Valerie Rosoux, ‘Federalization of the Belgian National Past: Do Collaboration and Colonization Still Matter?’ in Didier Caluwaerts and Min Reuchamps (eds), Belgian Exceptionalism: Belgian Politics between Realism and Surrealism (Routledge 2021). DOI: https://doi.org/10.4324/9781003104643. (Open Access)

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Intergenerational Justice in Post-colonial Settings: Can Procedures Tame Memories Related to Mass Atrocities?

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